Tag: Deadpool

What Writers Can Learn from Deadpool

Be un-apologetically you.   Know what sets you apart from the crowd.   You aren’t always going to win, and that’s okay.   Never lose your sense of humor. Don’t forget your bag of guns tools. Always be ready to help your fellow writer. Maximum Effort … or something like that.  

The Owl and the Raven

“The great destroyers of nations and men are comfort, plenty and security. A coward gets scared and quits. A hero gets scared, but still goes on. ”     – unknown “We make guilty of our disasters the sun, the moon, and the stars: as if we were villains by necessity; fools by heavenly compulsion.” – William Shakespeare The Owl Heroes rarely surprise us.  They … Read More The Owl and the Raven

Kill Me Softly

This is how I remember first meeting Boba Fett.  He was mysterious, dangerous and didn’t back down from one of the meanest villains in any genre.  It was love at first sight.  Then came the prequels.  The utter horror and dismay on my part as one of my all time favorite characters was reduced to a mere clone has stuck with me for years … Read More Kill Me Softly

This Pool is a Little Crowded Part 2

So last time I was talking about why Deadpool is NOT a hero.  No where does he fit the description of a typical action hero.  So does this mean he’s an anti-hero.  Lets look at that definition. antihero an·ti·he·ro [an-tee-heer-oh] noun, plural an·ti·he·roes. a protagonist who lacks the attributes that make a heroic figure,as nobility of mind and spirit, a life or attitude marked by action or purpose, and the like. Encyclopedia Britannica  Encyclopedia antihero a protagonist of a drama or narrative who is notably lacking in heroic qualities. This type of character has appeared in literature since the time of the Greek dramatists and can be found in the literary works of all nations. Examples include the title charactersof Miguel de Cervantes’s Don Quixote (Part I, 1605; Part II, 1615) and Henry Fielding’s Tom Jones (1749). Some examples of the modern, postwar antihero, as defined by the Angry Young Men,include Joe Lampton, in John Braine’s Room at the Top (1957),and Arthur Seaton, in Alan Sillitoe’s Saturday Night and Sunday Morning (1958). From the beginning of his series, its been established … Read More This Pool is a Little Crowded Part 2

This Pool is a Little Crowded

So, by now most you understand my fandoms, n’est pas?  Well, along with revisiting my Tron love, I happened to find a box of my old comics.  (I’d boarded and bagged all of them prior to storage of course, I’m a true fangirl after all.)  I still miss my Spawn comics.  Cannot forget that #6 Todd McFarlane cover.  Relatives should never be allowed to … Read More This Pool is a Little Crowded